Akçakaya Lab
Applied Ecology and Conservation Biology

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Our research focuses on developing and applying quantitative methods to address questions in conservation biology and environmental risk assessment.

We are currently interested in methods and approaches for predicting the vulnerability of species to global climate change, human land-use, toxicity and other threats. For more information see Research.

If you are interested in joining the Akçakaya lab as a graduate student, please read Information for Prospective Students.

News

Matt defended his thesis... Congratulations Dr. Aiello-Lammens!

Our new paper on the predictability of species extinction risks due to climate change is published in Nature Climate Change. Read about our recent publications on climate change impacts on biodiversity.

Our new paper on conservation of the endangered black-footed ferret and its plague-impacted prey is just published in the Journal of Applied Ecology (see the press release).

National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences released the report "Assessing Risks to Endangered and Threatened Species from Pesticides". Resit Akçakaya was a member of the committee that wrote the report.

Kevin Shoemaker's research is featured in the News section of Nature. The research, which was recently published in Conservation Biology, is highly relevant to questions of MVP, conservation triage, and conservation strategies for very rare species.

Presentations in 2013

H.R. Akçakaya, et al. "Extinction risk assessment and red-listing of species threatened with climate change". At the International Congress for Conservation Biology. Monday, 22 July, 4:15pm, room 301.

K. Shoemaker, et al. "Modeling the recovery of the endangered black-footed ferret in a linked predator-prey-disease system". At the International Congress for Conservation Biology. Monday, 22 July, 4:30pm, room 304.



Black footed ferret (Travis Livieri)
Black-footed ferrets are threatened as their primary prey, prairie dogs, experience population crashes caused by the plague.
Photo: Travis Livieri



Ornate Box Turtle is among the species in a study that focused on the predictability of species extinction risks due to climate change.
Photograph © Geoffrey A. Hammerson.



Iberian Lynx
Adapted conservation measures are required to save the Iberian lynx in a changing climate.




Global patterns of threat for vertebrates